It’s long been assumed that one day we’ll have semi-opaque, digital projections standing in the middle of our dinner table.

With a rise in holographic technology as well as the recent release of RED’s holographic phone, it looks like the holographic future we began imagining all the way back in 80’s and 90’s pop culture could be closer than we thought. But even if the technology exists, will it stick?

 

What’s the point you might say? Humans see the world in 3D, whereas our phone and computer screens only present a 2D image. Holograms allow us to transcend 2D digital media and enter into a space which could potentially trick the mind into thinking something artificial is in fact organic.

Brands are increasingly experimenting with this technology. 

Carlsberg resurrected founder JC Jacobsen for a Tedx talk (he died in 1887). Sky recorded David Attenborough for a VR experience. Cinema chain Movietime recently started selling holographic and AR supported ad space. This company has already developed a true holographic display. It’s goal? To replace your regular TV with one that can bring 3D holograms into your living room.

Just weeks ago, Facebook rolled out its 3D photos feature while Vimeo launched a channel for live streaming hologram videos.

This is an exciting opportunity to target the first generation of digital natives – Gen Z.

Desensitised to ads, Gen Z grew up in social media – this has shaped who they are and how they interact with the world around them. They value authenticity among brands – craving involvement and immersive experiences.

By 2020, Gen Z is expected to make up 40% of all consumers. If, like AR, holograms provide an intimate way for brands to connect with customers, could this be the answer to reaching Gen Z’s ‘sweet spot’?

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Ellis Jan 18th, 2019

About Ellis Fox